Home > Asia-Pacific, Economics > South Korea: Labour Strife Escalates as New Labour Law Comes Into Effect

South Korea: Labour Strife Escalates as New Labour Law Comes Into Effect

Jamie Doucette writes in Interlocals (also available on ZNet):

On July 1st South Korea’s new Law on Non-Regular Work came into effect. The principle of the law was to protect non-regular workers, but in practice the way in which it has been put together and implemented has led to protection only for a few and increased precariousness for many.

The law was a long time in the making, and the original plan was to involve all parties — unions, business, and government — in the drafting process of the bill. However, very early on the tripartite process broke down, with the progressive Korean Confederation of Trade Unions (KCTU) pulling out of the process when it became clear that the law would only lead to the expansion of casual, contingent, contract and temporary forms of work.

The tripartite commission did not attempt attempt to assuage the worries of the KCTU but instead rushed through an agreement on the bill with the support of the more conservative Federation of Korean Trade Unions (FKTU). The bill was passed amidst heated protest in the late fall of 2006 and came into effect on July 1st.

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Categories: Asia-Pacific, Economics
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