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Posts Tagged ‘Audio or Video’

Alain Badiou: Video of interview on Hardtalk

April 7, 2009 1 comment

Alain Badiou, a French philosopher, is interviewed on BBC’s Hardtalk. He discusses capitalism during the current economic crisis. He touches on ideas of emancipation and the construction of an alternative society.

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Philosophy lectures online

The European Graduate School’s media and communications program has an impressive and growing Youtube channel with over 600 video lectures on philosophy, film, politics, and art.

Lecturers include Jacques Derrida, Donna Haraway, Jean Beaudrillard, Slavoj Zizek, Peter Greenaway, Judith Butler, Manuel DeLanda, Alain Badiou, Atom Egoyan, Giorgi Agamben, Avital Ronell, Chantal Akerman, Michael Hardt, and many more.

This site has enough to keep you occupied for months. Check out the EGS Video channel.

Here’s a sample from the site:

Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler, and Larry Rickels

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Differences within Islam

March 31, 2009 Leave a comment

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Ahmad Moussalli, a professor at the American University of Beirut has written a short essay to help the reader understand the differences between “opposing trends in modern Islamic thought that are normally and mistakenly lumped together as Islamism, fundamentalism, salafism, neo-salafism, Wahhabism, jihadism, political Islam, Islamic radicalism and others.”

Read his essay (PDF) online.

Also, Juan Cole, a historian on the Middle East, was recently interviewed on a similar subject, following the publication of his book, “Engaging the Muslim World.”

The interview was conducted on Riz Khan’s program:

Part 1

Part 2

War for peace: Global order and war in Pakistan

March 31, 2009 1 comment

The war in Afghanistan has become the war in Afghanistan and Pakistan, sometimes termed the Afpak war by the US administration. This expansion into Pakistan reveals much about the nature of the war in the region, is a response to the origin story of the Taliban, and reflects the practice of the rights of the dominant international subjects to intervene throughout the world in the name of global order.

The current US administration, under president Barack Obama, has refocused its attention on Central and South Asia after its predecessor had shifted the greater part of its international policy resources to the war in Iraq. President Obama has increasingly articulated a US and NATO policy that has been a growing reality since the tail end of the US presidential election campaign: de-emphasis on Iraq and emphasis and resurgence of international political-military activity in and around Afghanistan.

In this regard, the US will in the short term be sending some 21,000 more troops to Afghanistan, and it will be sending a great number more civilian experts to train and handle Afghan bureaucrats and politicians.

Taliban Sans Frontiere

The Taliban’s presence is today strongest in southern Afghanistan and north western Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and the North-West Frontier Province (read my article on the Taliban presence in FATA for more information). These areas constitute the majority of the Pashtun people’s territories. The Taliban has its roots in Pashtun culture. Almost all Taliban leaders are of Pashtun origin, and they are currently the primary power bloc within these highly tribal influenced people. In fact the Taliban’s rules and codes, as they enforce them in territories they effectively govern, are a synthesis of a particular Sunni school of religious conduct (originally from India’s Deobandi school) and the Pashtun tribal rules known as Pashtunwali.

Read more…

Video Brief: Afghan Refugees, NATO Air Strikes, and Early Elections

March 3, 2009 1 comment

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This video covers the millions of Afghan refugees in Iran, with a focus on the children, then views British troops fighting in Afghanistan, followed by the Afghan citizens’ response to their president’s call for an early election.

The first part is from a short documentary by Iranian director Mohsen Makhmalbaf, entitled the Afghan Alphabet, then clips from a CBC report called Battlefield Afghanistan, and concluding with an Al Jazeera English news report on political development within Afghanistan.

Child Labour in Afghanistan: 37,000 in Kabul Alone

February 18, 2009 1 comment

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This report by Al Jazeera briefly reviews a rise in child labour in Afghanistan, many scavenging in garbage dumps or on the streets of the capital.

Theory of Nonhuman of Expressivity: DeLanda on Deleuze

February 5, 2009 2 comments

Below are videos on DeLanda’s thoughts on Deleuze’s theory of nonhuman expressivity. DeLanda speaks on the migration from ‘finger prints’ in nature, to signatures such as animal markings of territory, to style. He goes on to mention that our environment, including architecture, affords us opportunities and risks that animals and humans perceive then act upon. Could not the content, style, and medium of communication also afford potentialities?

DeLanda insists on the importance of a continuum that exists between life expressivity in nature to expressions of community and solidarity, to an expressivity of legitimacy. Essentially, specific expressions of life exist within expressions of political legitimacy, that messages on militarism, health, and more are included in these forms of communication.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

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